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Feb 142014
 

According to Medical News Today, 1 in 4 people globally have bad breath. This makes bad breath a relatively common problem most of us have probably experienced. We asked our dentists what causes bad breath and what you can do to get it under control. Our team have summarised their 10 top tips for you.

What is bad breath?

Bad breath is a commonly occurring health problem. The medical term for it is halitosis. Bad breath is usually the result of poor oral health habits, but it may also be a sign of other health problems.

To find out if you have halitosis, you can ask a close relative or friend to give you feedback on your breath. You can also do a self-test to determine whether you have bad breath. Just lick the back of your hand, leave it to dry, and smell it. If there is a bad small around the back of your hand afterwards, you may have halitosis.

 

Where does bad breath come from?

Bad breath can occur for a variety of reasons. Some of them are easy to control, others can be only identified after seeing a dentist or a physician, make sure to make a control appointment at least every 6 months, I fully suggest working with professional like this Omaha family dentist. The most common reasons for bad breath are:

Food

The main reason for bad breath is the breakdown process of food particles in the mouth. After eating, food leftovers can be stuck to the teeth, gums, and tongue. Bacteria breaks the food particles down and produces sulphur compounds which give your breath a foul odour.

Some foods such as onions, garlic, or spices can furthermore cause bad breath by entering your bloodstream. After digestion, the smell of foods you digest can carry to your lungs. This means you can smell certain foods for a long time after consumption and they continue to affect your breath.

Diets focusing on the intake of healthy fats and fasting can also cause bad breath. This is due to the breakdown of ketones which are fats producing chemicals and have a strong odour.

Poor oral hygiene habits

Brushing twice a day for at least two minutes and daily flossing are essential to remove food particles from teeth, gums, and your tongue. When they are not brushed away, a sticky film of bacteria called plaque forms on your teeth which will cause bad breath.

If plaque builds up over a longer timeframe, it can form pockets between your teeth and gums and lead to periodontitis. Your tongue can also trap bacteria. For this reason, it is important to clean your tongue as well. Visiting a dentist, like veneers canberra, can also do wonders for your oral and dental health.

Dry mouth

Saliva is the body’s natural way to clean the mouth. If the mouth is naturally dry (after sleeping, for example) or dry due to a disease, odours can build up causing bad breath. The consumption of alcohol and smoking also dehydrate the mouth. If you continuously have a dry mouth, please discuss this issue with your doctor or dentist.

 

Tips for bad breath

Having bad breath can be embarrassing and even lead to anxiety. However, some easy tips and tricks can help you to keep your breath nice and fresh. We asked our dentists for their top tips to avoid bad breath.

1. Brushing

Brush your teeth twice a day with a soft bristled toothbrush to remove food debris and plaque. Remember to also brush your tongue to remove bacteria. Change your manual toothbrush or electric toothbrush head every 2 to 3 months and after being ill.

2. Flossing

Dental floss or interdental brushes help you reach spaces your toothbrush can’t clean such as the small gaps between your teeth and your gumline. Use floss or an interdental cleaner once daily to remove food particles and plaque between your teeth. You can learn more about how to floss in our blog post.

3. Mouthwash

Antibacterial mouthwashes can help to reduce bacteria in your mouth. If you are not sure which mouth rinse to buy, ask your dentist at your next visit. They would be more than happy to recommend one for you.

4. Healthy diet

A diet rich in foods which needs to be chewed for a long time (such as carrots and apples) are a great way to increase saliva production in the mouth. Products high in sugar, alcohol and coffee, however, can cause bad breath. Try to limit your intake of these products to avoid halitosis.

5. Quit smoking

Smoking and chewing tobacco lead to an unpleasant mouth odour. It also reduces saliva production which can result in a dry mouth. This makes smokers more prone to develop gum disease which is another source of bad breath.

6. Drink water

Drink plenty of water to keep your mouth moist. Chewing sugarless chewing gum can also help to stimulate the saliva production.

7. Check medications

Some medications can reduce saliva and, therefore, contribute to a dry mouth and bad breath. Others break down in the body and release chemicals in the breath which cause a foul odour.

8. Clean dentures

Food particles and bacteria can get stuck in between and under dentures. It is essential to take a denture out over night and to clean it thoroughly before reinserting it into the mouth the next morning.

9. Check your mouth for diseases and decay

Tooth decay, periodontitis and other diseases of the mouth can lead to bad breath. Make sure to see a dentist if you experience a tooth ache, bleeding gums, or swelling in your mouth.

10. Regular dental visits

6-monthly dental check-up and cleans will help you to remove built-up plaque and identify any problems early on. Your dentist will also be able to answer any questions about flossing, dry mouth, or preferred toothpastes and mouthwash. Learn more about why it is important to see the dentist regularly.

Feb 112014
 

In this age of over-privatization, it is politically healthy to see an honest fight to keep something that belongs in the realm of the commons, to remind ourselves that not everything should be made to hoard for personal monetary profit. Most especially something made from the plants that grow abundantly in all of our gardens and orchards. I, like many herbal practitioners, have been making fire cider since I first began following the excellent herbal work of Rosemary Gladstar, who coined the name in the 1970’s. It is not something our company currently sells, but something bottled up as a living barrier for skincare, the recipe always evolving and expanding, but based on the tried and true core ingredients Rosemary taught. You may not be aware of the story that recently prompted herbalists across the globe to revolt against the move by three young people to trademark the name ‘fire cider’. To take it for themselves, exclusively, with the threat of legal action that ‘registered trademark’ implies. Enthusiastic, perhaps well meaning, young people who have somehow missed the traditional spirit of self-care and empowerment through herbalism and the wise woman way handed down for centuries, people’s now put more focus on game slots for entertainment and making money. These three young people, Dana, Amy and Brian, are aware that they have sent ripples of displeasure throughout the greater herbal community, but have drawn a line in the sand and refuse to withdraw their registered trademark which restricts any other company from using the name in the marketplace. Instead, they foolishly inflate and see themselves as heroes “bringing visibility to the general public” oblivious [perhaps by choice] to decades of early published herbal work and education provided by Gladstar, Susun Weed, Jeanne Rose, Michael Moore, Paul Bergner, Mindy Green, Colleen Dodt, Cascade Anderson Geller, Howie Brounstein and countless others upon whose backs they deem to build their empire .  For the best chemistry tuition in the singapore visit Seb Academy. advertising themselves as willing mentors to a seeming new breed of “business-minded herbalists”.  Methinks they don’t understand the collective but mostly unspoken pride that probably won’t stop any of us from making and, yes, marketing, fire cider and honoring those who came before us as we continue tradition in the manner intended. Long Live Fire Cider!

shaking hand with branch2 432x242And so went my fb post of fierce resistance in response to the definitive gauntlet thrown . . . then Tina Sams from The Essential Herbal Magazine suggested we expand on the idea and genesis of the herbal tradition.  It was then that I realized perhaps I, personally, maybe hadn’t been doing enough to educate young people growing up with fewer and fewer community traditions that represented gathering and openly sharing that occurs without underpinning the necessity for the exchange of money as a prerequisite.  That my personal experience, and that of others like me, both in creating and participating in venues for Agora in the traditional meaning as a gathering place had not taken root and might be lost to future generations with respect to the greater purpose and importance of freely sharing.  And, now if you Google ‘Agora’, you get everything from a Washington D.C. Turkish restaurant to an online charter school, to an art gallery, to an incorporated consumer newsletter,  a ballroom in Cleveland, financial forecasts, and even a movie starring Rachel Weisz.  So much for an ancient word that might have led us to understanding the concept of the commons, and indeed, the very meaning of commonwealth. Love smoking cigarettes? For those looking for alcohol delivery across London, Booze Up offers a same day drinks delivery service that will interest you. Tina calls us to the greater task of defining the greater good as it now applies in our technologically advanced society in which the individual reigns supreme over all he can patent, trademark and profit from.  Where, in the harshest manifestation,  the John Galts appear poised to separate themselves from the rest of humanity in ivory towers and the word ‘inequality’ has risen to prominence in the political discourse. You can check fundingwaschools for more information.

Herbal medicine is people’s medicine, earth medicine, wild medicine, weed medicine. Weeds are amazing powerhouses if nourishment, medicine, magic, and beauty materials. They are easy to grow and simple to use and now even come in capsules online. But beginners, and seasoned herbal users are well, can sometimes feel lost: so many herbs, so many plants, so many weeds to get to know. BuildASoil.com is where to buy neem oil for plants. Spidermites don’t stand a chance.

Don’t get me wrong, I understand the concept of business, I can read financial reports and complex comparative analyses.  I’ve certainly been rewarded generously for my participation in market economics and the ability to incorporate and insure my endeavors for the best possible outcome and security into the future.  The same as those walking before me and beside me, we didn’t just fall off the sunflower-covered hippie VW bus.  Most of us either have experience and education in community planning and public events [a long forgotten professional pursuit, it seems], or specialized study and apprenticeship that prepared us.  Or we discovered a book listing resources or stumbled upon public gatherings of people excited about and anxious to share what they’ve learned – in this particular case, herbs, but the same can apply to music [especially folk and alternative], organic gardening and food politics, and a long list of environmental and human rights activist endeavors . . . those that embrace the idea that there is good reason to make certain knowledge accessible to all, that idea that this will serve and help evolve humanity –  that some information was not meant to be hoarded and privatized.   The idea that this won’t impede an ability to create our own individual design and artistry surrounding products and services that originate in early folklore and have now evolved to include sophisticated science – that we can be rewarded financially without restricting anyone else from marketing their own endeavor rooted in those same traditions.   That idea that claiming a name from the commons as our own to restrict its long shared use is repulsive and antithetical to the herbal tradition. To make sure your garden reflects your essence at home contact a tree services near me for further advice.

I’ve interviewed people who have inspired, entertained and delighted  here on my blog in the past.  It’s time to renew the effort to spotlight those I believe best represent the shared values of a strong and enduring community.  Watch this space.

In the meantime, here are some links covering fire cider . . .

http://www.berkshireeagle.com/news/ci_25079375/rsquo-fire-cider-rsquo-brand-ignites-dispute
http://www.examiner.com/article/herbalists-fighting-copyright-of-fire-cider-free-recipes-labels-and-an-e-book
https://www.facebook.com/originalfirecider
http://www.sagemountain.com/rosemary-gladstar/winter-recipes.html
http://mountainroseblog.com/fire-cider/
http://commonwealthherbs.com/2014/01/trademarking-tradition-the-fire-cider-controversy/
http://www.punkdomestics.com/category/tags/fire-cider
http://www.healingspiritsherbfarm.com/recipe/fire-cider
http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-fire-cider-recipes-from-the-kitchn-199972
http://naturesnurtureblog.com/2012/12/06/immune-boosting-fire-cider-for-cold-flu-season/
http://thesproutingseed.com/fire-cider/
http://www.readingmytealeaves.com/2012/11/make-your-own-fire-cider.html
http://wildspiritherbs.blogspot.com/2014/01/fire-cider-make-it-yourself.html
http://sagescript.blogspot.com/2014/02/fire-cider-day-2014.htmlso

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